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Articles > 28 Career Matches for the INTP

28 Career Matches for the INTP

See which careers match well with the typical INTP personality.

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What careers match nicely with the INTP personality?

After a short summary of INTPs’ career interests, you’ll find 28 potential career fits for INTPs, identified by combining data about INTP personality patterns with detailed occupational information from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

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INTP Career Interests

The chart below shows where INTPs tend to fall on the classic RIASEC career interest dimensions: Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, and Conventional.

Your unique blend of these dimensions dramatically influences how well a career feels like a good fit.

The dark blue areas show where INTPs are most likely to fall on each dimension.

INTPs and RIASEC career interests
Patterns of career interests among INTPs

Most INTPs tend to have the following pattern of interests:

  • High Investigative interests (Thinkers): People with strong Investigative interests prefer roles that require observation, researching, and understanding ideas. They tend to prefer working with data and ideas rather than working closely with other people. Examples include medical researchers, chemists, software engineers, scientific reporters, and statisticians.

  • High Realistic interests (Doers): People with high Realistic interests enjoy careers that allow them to work with their hands or tools to get a job done, rather than thinking or talking about it. They may also gravitate towards jobs with opportunities for working outdoors, competition, and risk-taking. Examples include police officers, military officers, professional athletes, farmers, builders, mechanics, forest rangers, and woodworkers.

  • Average Enterprising interests (Persuaders): People with strong Enterprising interests are often skilled communicators and enjoy influencing, persuading, and leading other people. They actively pursue leadership roles and opportunities to bolster their status and reputation. Examples include sales and marketing directors, politicians and political organizers, and executives.

  • Average Artistic interests (Creators): People with strong Artistic interests prefer jobs that require innovation through artistic and intuitive skills in less structured tasks and environments. Examples include artists, novelists, actors or actresses, musicians, curators, and designers.

  • Average Conventional interests (Organizers): People with strong Conventional interests excel in roles that require categorizing, planning, and systematizing information and processes. Examples include financial officers, budget analysts, office managers, database analysts, and systems administrators.

  • Low Social interests (Helpers): People with strong Social interests fit well with careers that involve helping, comforting, caring for, and teaching other people. Examples include physical therapists, counselors, clergy, social workers, doctors, and nurses.

However, it’s possible to find INTPs at any point on any of these six dimensions. While most INTPs have relatively low Social interests, there are still a few INTPs who score very highly on them.

For a more precise assessment of your unique combination of personality traits, career interests, and much more, try the assessments here at TraitLab.

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Most INTPs have deep Investigative interests, pulling them towards roles with heavy demands for thinking, analysis, and research.

Many INTPs also have intense Realistic interests, meaning they will gravitate towards roles with opportunities for building and creating directly with their hands or with tools.

Some INTPs have relatively higher Enterprising interests, which fit well with roles requiring leading, persuading, and influencing other people.

INTP Career Matches

People who work in the following 28 occupations tend to have similar interests to most INTPs:

Agricultural Engineers

Agricultural Engineers may also have job titles such as Agricultural Engineer, Agricultural Systems Specialist, Conservation Engineer, Engineer, Product Engineer, Product Technology Scientist, Project Engineer, or Research Agricultural Engineer.

What do Agricultural Engineers do?

Agricultural Engineers apply knowledge of engineering technology and biological science to agricultural problems concerned with power and machinery, electrification, structures, soil and water conservation, and processing of agricultural products. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
  • Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.

Salary and compensation for Agricultural Engineers

Agricultural Engineers earn a median hourly wage of about $40, and a median annual salary of $84,410.

Educational requirements for Agricultural Engineers

Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor’s degree, but some do not. In addition, employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.

Materials Engineers

Materials Engineers may also have job titles such as Extrusion Engineer, Materials Development Engineer, Materials Engineer, Materials Research Engineer, Metallurgical Engineer, Metallurgist, Research Engineer, or Test Engineer.

What do Materials Engineers do?

Materials Engineers evaluate materials and develop machinery and processes to manufacture materials for use in products that must meet specialized design and performance specifications. Develop new uses for known materials. Includes those engineers working with composite materials or specializing in one type of material, such as graphite, metal and metal alloys, ceramics and glass, plastics and polymers, and naturally occurring materials. Includes metallurgists and metallurgical engineers, ceramic engineers, and welding engineers. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.
  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
  • Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

Salary and compensation for Materials Engineers

Materials Engineers earn a median hourly wage of about $45, and a median annual salary of $95,640.

Educational requirements for Materials Engineers

Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor’s degree, but some do not. In addition, employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.

Marine Engineers and Naval Architects

Marine Engineers and Naval Architects may also have job titles such as Marine Architect, Marine Design Engineer, Marine Engineer, Marine Engineering Consultant, Marine Structural Designer, Marine Surveyor, Naval Architect, Naval Architect Specialist, Ships Equipment Engineer, or Structural Engineer.

What do Marine Engineers and Naval Architects do?

Marine Engineers and Naval Architects design, develop, and evaluate the operation of marine vessels, ship machinery, and related equipment, such as power supply and propulsion systems. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.
  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Providing documentation, detailed instructions, drawings, or specifications to tell others about how devices, parts, equipment, or structures are to be fabricated, constructed, assembled, modified, maintained, or used.
  • Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

Salary and compensation for Marine Engineers and Naval Architects

Marine Engineers and Naval Architects earn a median hourly wage of about $45, and a median annual salary of $95,440.

Educational requirements for Marine Engineers and Naval Architects

Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor’s degree, but some do not. In addition, employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.

Materials Scientists

Materials Scientists may also have job titles such as Materials Scientist, Micro Electrical/Mechanical Systems Device Scientist (MEMS Device Scientist), Polymer Materials Consultant, Research and Development Scientist (R and D Scientist), Research Scientist, or Scientist.

What do Materials Scientists do?

Materials Scientists research and study the structures and chemical properties of various natural and synthetic or composite materials, including metals, alloys, rubber, ceramics, semiconductors, polymers, and glass. Determine ways to strengthen or combine materials or develop new materials with new or specific properties for use in a variety of products and applications. Includes glass scientists, ceramic scientists, metallurgical scientists, and polymer scientists. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
  • Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.

Salary and compensation for Materials Scientists

Materials Scientists earn a median hourly wage of about $47, and a median annual salary of $99,460.

Educational requirements for Materials Scientists

Most of these occupations require graduate school. For example, they may require a master’s degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree). In addition, employees may need some on-the-job training, but most of these occupations assume that the person will already have the required skills, knowledge, work-related experience, and/or training.

Hydrologists

Hydrologists may also have job titles such as Groundwater Consultant, Hydrogeologist, Hydrologist, Physical Scientist, Research Hydrologist, Scientist, or Source Water Protection Specialist.

What do Hydrologists do?

Hydrologists research the distribution, circulation, and physical properties of underground and surface waters; and study the form and intensity of precipitation and its rate of infiltration into the soil, movement through the earth, and return to the ocean and atmosphere. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

Salary and compensation for Hydrologists

Hydrologists earn a median hourly wage of about $40, and a median annual salary of $84,040.

Educational requirements for Hydrologists

Most of these occupations require graduate school. For example, they may require a master’s degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree). In addition, employees may need some on-the-job training, but most of these occupations assume that the person will already have the required skills, knowledge, work-related experience, and/or training.

Electrical Engineers

Electrical Engineers may also have job titles such as Circuits Engineer, Design Engineer, Electrical Controls Engineer, Electrical Design Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Electrical Project Engineer, Instrumentation and Electrical Reliability Engineer (IE Reliability Engineer), Power Systems Engineer, Project Engineer, or Test Engineer.

What do Electrical Engineers do?

Electrical Engineers research, design, develop, test, or supervise the manufacturing and installation of electrical equipment, components, or systems for commercial, industrial, military, or scientific use. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.
  • Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Salary and compensation for Electrical Engineers

Electrical Engineers earn a median hourly wage of about $48, and a median annual salary of $100,830.

Educational requirements for Electrical Engineers

Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor’s degree, but some do not. In addition, employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.

Chemical Engineers

Chemical Engineers may also have job titles such as Chemical Engineer, Development Engineer, Engineer, Engineering Scientist, Process Control Engineer, Process Engineer, Project Engineer, Refinery Process Engineer, Research Chemical Engineer, or Scientist.

What do Chemical Engineers do?

Chemical Engineers design chemical plant equipment and devise processes for manufacturing chemicals and products, such as gasoline, synthetic rubber, plastics, detergents, cement, paper, and pulp, by applying principles and technology of chemistry, physics, and engineering. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
  • Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

Salary and compensation for Chemical Engineers

Chemical Engineers earn a median hourly wage of about $52, and a median annual salary of $108,540.

Educational requirements for Chemical Engineers

Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor’s degree, but some do not. In addition, employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.

Aerospace Engineers

Aerospace Engineers may also have job titles such as Aeronautical Engineer, Aerospace Engineer, Aerospace Stress Engineer, Avionics Engineer, Design Engineer, Flight Controls Engineer, Flight Test Engineer, Structural Analysis Engineer, Systems Engineer, or Test Engineer.

What do Aerospace Engineers do?

Aerospace Engineers perform engineering duties in designing, constructing, and testing aircraft, missiles, and spacecraft. May conduct basic and applied research to evaluate adaptability of materials and equipment to aircraft design and manufacture. May recommend improvements in testing equipment and techniques. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
  • Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
  • Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.
  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

Salary and compensation for Aerospace Engineers

Aerospace Engineers earn a median hourly wage of about $57, and a median annual salary of $118,610.

Educational requirements for Aerospace Engineers

Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor’s degree, but some do not. In addition, employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.

Animal Scientists

Animal Scientists may also have job titles such as Animal Nutrition Consultant, Animal Nutritionist, Animal Scientist, Beef Cattle Specialist, Dairy Nutrition Consultant, or Research Scientist.

What do Animal Scientists do?

Animal Scientists conduct research in the genetics, nutrition, reproduction, growth, and development of domestic farm animals. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
  • Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
  • Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.

Salary and compensation for Animal Scientists

Animal Scientists earn a median hourly wage of about $30, and a median annual salary of $63,490.

Educational requirements for Animal Scientists

Most of these occupations require graduate school. For example, they may require a master’s degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree). In addition, employees may need some on-the-job training, but most of these occupations assume that the person will already have the required skills, knowledge, work-related experience, and/or training.

Zoologists and Wildlife Biologists

Zoologists and Wildlife Biologists may also have job titles such as Aquatic Biologist, Conservation Resources Management Biologist, Fish and Wildlife Biologist, Fisheries Biologist, Fisheries Management Biologist, Habitat Biologist, Migratory Game Bird Biologist, Wildlife Biologist, or Zoologist.

What do Zoologists and Wildlife Biologists do?

Zoologists and Wildlife Biologists study the origins, behavior, diseases, genetics, and life processes of animals and wildlife. May specialize in wildlife research and management. May collect and analyze biological data to determine the environmental effects of present and potential use of land and water habitats. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
  • Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
  • Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
  • Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Salary and compensation for Zoologists and Wildlife Biologists

Zoologists and Wildlife Biologists earn a median hourly wage of about $31, and a median annual salary of $66,350.

Educational requirements for Zoologists and Wildlife Biologists

Most of these occupations require graduate school. For example, they may require a master’s degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree). In addition, employees may need some on-the-job training, but most of these occupations assume that the person will already have the required skills, knowledge, work-related experience, and/or training.

Civil Engineers

Civil Engineers may also have job titles such as City Engineer, Civil Engineer, County Engineer, Design Engineer, Project Engineer, Railroad Design Consultant, or Structural Engineer.

What do Civil Engineers do?

Civil Engineers perform engineering duties in planning, designing, and overseeing construction and maintenance of building structures and facilities, such as roads, railroads, airports, bridges, harbors, channels, dams, irrigation projects, pipelines, power plants, and water and sewage systems. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
  • Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
  • Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

Salary and compensation for Civil Engineers

Civil Engineers earn a median hourly wage of about $42, and a median annual salary of $88,570.

Educational requirements for Civil Engineers

Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor’s degree, but some do not. In addition, employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.

Environmental Engineers

Environmental Engineers may also have job titles such as Air Pollution Control Engineer, Engineer, Engineering Consultant, Environmental Engineer, Environmental Remediation Specialist, Hazardous Substances Engineer, or Sanitary Engineer.

What do Environmental Engineers do?

Environmental Engineers research, design, plan, or perform engineering duties in the prevention, control, and remediation of environmental hazards using various engineering disciplines. Work may include waste treatment, site remediation, or pollution control technology. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.
  • Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.

Salary and compensation for Environmental Engineers

Environmental Engineers earn a median hourly wage of about $44, and a median annual salary of $92,120.

Educational requirements for Environmental Engineers

Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor’s degree, but some do not. In addition, employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.

Food Scientists and Technologists

Food Scientists and Technologists may also have job titles such as Food and Drug Research Scientist, Food Chemist, Food Engineer, Food Scientist, Food Technologist, Formulator, Product Development Scientist, Research Chef, Research Food Technologist, or Research Scientist.

What do Food Scientists and Technologists do?

Food Scientists and Technologists use chemistry, microbiology, engineering, and other sciences to study the principles underlying the processing and deterioration of foods; analyze food content to determine levels of vitamins, fat, sugar, and protein; discover new food sources; research ways to make processed foods safe, palatable, and healthful; and apply food science knowledge to determine best ways to process, package, preserve, store, and distribute food. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.
  • Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.

Salary and compensation for Food Scientists and Technologists

Food Scientists and Technologists earn a median hourly wage of about $35, and a median annual salary of $73,450.

Educational requirements for Food Scientists and Technologists

Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor’s degree, but some do not. In addition, employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.

Physicists

Physicists may also have job titles such as Biophysics Scientist, Health Physicist, Medical Physicist, Physicist, Research Consultant, Research Physicist, Research Scientist, or Scientist.

What do Physicists do?

Physicists conduct research into physical phenomena, develop theories on the basis of observation and experiments, and devise methods to apply physical laws and theories. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.
  • Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

Salary and compensation for Physicists

Physicists earn a median hourly wage of about $62, and a median annual salary of $129,850.

Educational requirements for Physicists

Most of these occupations require graduate school. For example, they may require a master’s degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree). In addition, employees may need some on-the-job training, but most of these occupations assume that the person will already have the required skills, knowledge, work-related experience, and/or training.

Chemical Technicians

Chemical Technicians may also have job titles such as Chemical Analyst, Chemical Technician, Formulation Technician, Laboratory Analyst (Lab Analyst), Laboratory Technician (Lab Tech), Laboratory Tester (Lab Tester), Organic Preparation Analyst (Organic Prep Analyst), Quality Control Technician (QC Technician), Research Technician, or Water Quality Technician.

What do Chemical Technicians do?

Chemical Technicians conduct chemical and physical laboratory tests to assist scientists in making qualitative and quantitative analyses of solids, liquids, and gaseous materials for research and development of new products or processes, quality control, maintenance of environmental standards, and other work involving experimental, theoretical, or practical application of chemistry and related sciences. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
  • Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.
  • Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Salary and compensation for Chemical Technicians

Chemical Technicians earn a median hourly wage of about $23, and a median annual salary of $49,820.

Educational requirements for Chemical Technicians

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate’s degree. In addition, employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.

Petroleum Engineers

Petroleum Engineers may also have job titles such as Completion Engineer, Drilling Engineer, Engineer, Operations Engineer, Petroleum Engineer, Petroleum Production Engineer, Project Production Engineer, Project Reservoir Engineer, Reservoir Engineer, or Reservoir Engineering Consultant.

What do Petroleum Engineers do?

Petroleum Engineers devise methods to improve oil and gas extraction and production and determine the need for new or modified tool designs. Oversee drilling and offer technical advice. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.
  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

Salary and compensation for Petroleum Engineers

Petroleum Engineers earn a median hourly wage of about $66, and a median annual salary of $137,330.

Educational requirements for Petroleum Engineers

Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor’s degree, but some do not. In addition, employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.

Computer and Information Research Scientists

Computer and Information Research Scientists may also have job titles such as Computer Scientist, Computer Specialist, Control System Computer Scientist, Research Scientist, or Scientific Programmer Analyst.

What do Computer and Information Research Scientists do?

Computer and Information Research Scientists conduct research into fundamental computer and information science as theorists, designers, or inventors. Develop solutions to problems in the field of computer hardware and software. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.
  • Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.

Salary and compensation for Computer and Information Research Scientists

Computer and Information Research Scientists earn a median hourly wage of about $60, and a median annual salary of $126,830.

Educational requirements for Computer and Information Research Scientists

Most of these occupations require graduate school. For example, they may require a master’s degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree). In addition, employees may need some on-the-job training, but most of these occupations assume that the person will already have the required skills, knowledge, work-related experience, and/or training.

Mechanical Engineers

Mechanical Engineers may also have job titles such as Application Engineer, Design Engineer, Design Maintenance Engineer, Equipment Engineer, Mechanical Design Engineer, Mechanical Engineer, Process Engineer, Product Engineer, Project Engineer, or Test Engineer.

What do Mechanical Engineers do?

Mechanical Engineers perform engineering duties in planning and designing tools, engines, machines, and other mechanically functioning equipment. Oversee installation, operation, maintenance, and repair of equipment such as centralized heat, gas, water, and steam systems. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
  • Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

Salary and compensation for Mechanical Engineers

Mechanical Engineers earn a median hourly wage of about $43, and a median annual salary of $90,160.

Educational requirements for Mechanical Engineers

Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor’s degree, but some do not. In addition, employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.

Microbiologists

Microbiologists may also have job titles such as Bacteriologist, Clinical Laboratory Scientist, Clinical Microbiologist, Microbiological Analyst, Microbiologist, or Quality Control Microbiologist (QC Microbiologist).

What do Microbiologists do?

Microbiologists investigate the growth, structure, development, and other characteristics of microscopic organisms, such as bacteria, algae, or fungi. Includes medical microbiologists who study the relationship between organisms and disease or the effects of antibiotics on microorganisms. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.
  • Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
  • Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
  • Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

Salary and compensation for Microbiologists

Microbiologists earn a median hourly wage of about $40, and a median annual salary of $84,400.

Educational requirements for Microbiologists

Most of these occupations require graduate school. For example, they may require a master’s degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree). In addition, employees may need some on-the-job training, but most of these occupations assume that the person will already have the required skills, knowledge, work-related experience, and/or training.

Network and Computer Systems Administrators

Network and Computer Systems Administrators may also have job titles such as Information Analyst, Information Systems Manager (IS Manager), Information Technology Specialist (IT Specialist), LAN Specialist (Local Area Network Specialist), Local Area Network Administrator (LAN Administrator), Network Administrator, Network Coordinator, Network Manager, or Systems Administrator.

What do Network and Computer Systems Administrators do?

Network and Computer Systems Administrators install, configure, and maintain an organization’s local area network (LAN), wide area network (WAN), data communications network, operating systems, and physical and virtual servers. Perform system monitoring and verify the integrity and availability of hardware, network, and server resources and systems. Review system and application logs and verify completion of scheduled jobs, including system backups. Analyze network and server resource consumption and control user access. Install and upgrade software and maintain software licenses. May assist in network modeling, analysis, planning, and coordination between network and data communications hardware and software. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

Salary and compensation for Network and Computer Systems Administrators

Network and Computer Systems Administrators earn a median hourly wage of about $40, and a median annual salary of $84,810.

Educational requirements for Network and Computer Systems Administrators

Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor’s degree, but some do not. In addition, employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.

Industrial Engineering Technologists and Technicians

Industrial Engineering Technologists and Technicians may also have job titles such as Business Process Analyst, Engineering Technician, Industrial Engineering Analyst, Industrial Engineering Technician, Manufacturing Coordinator, Manufacturing Technology Analyst, Quality Control Engineering Technician (QC Engineering Technician), Quality Management Coordinator, Quality Technician, or Service Technician.

What do Industrial Engineering Technologists and Technicians do?

Industrial Engineering Technologists and Technicians apply engineering theory and principles to problems of industrial layout or manufacturing production, usually under the direction of engineering staff. May perform time and motion studies on worker operations in a variety of industries for purposes such as establishing standard production rates or improving efficiency. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Providing documentation, detailed instructions, drawings, or specifications to tell others about how devices, parts, equipment, or structures are to be fabricated, constructed, assembled, modified, maintained, or used.
  • Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.
  • Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

Salary and compensation for Industrial Engineering Technologists and Technicians

Industrial Engineering Technologists and Technicians earn a median hourly wage of about $27, and a median annual salary of $57,320.

Educational requirements for Industrial Engineering Technologists and Technicians

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate’s degree. In addition, employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.

Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologists

Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologists may also have job titles such as Chief Medical Technologist; Clinical Laboratory Scientist (CLS); Clinical Laboratory Technologist; Histologist Technologist; Medical Laboratory Technologist (Medical Lab Tech); Medical Technologist (MT); Medical Technologist, or Clinical Laboratory Scientist; Microbiology Technologist.

What do Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologists do?

Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologists perform complex medical laboratory tests for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease. May train or supervise staff. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.
  • Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

Salary and compensation for Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologists

Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologists earn a median hourly wage of about $26, and a median annual salary of $54,180.

Educational requirements for Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologists

Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor’s degree, but some do not. In addition, employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.

Aerospace Engineering and Operations Technologists and Technicians

Aerospace Engineering and Operations Technologists and Technicians may also have job titles such as Avionics Installation Technician, Avionics Technician, Avionics Test Technician, Engineering Technician, Engineering Test Technician, Flight Test Instrument Technician, Instrumentation Technician, Systems Test Technician, or Test Technician.

What do Aerospace Engineering and Operations Technologists and Technicians do?

Aerospace Engineering and Operations Technologists and Technicians operate, install, adjust, and maintain integrated computer/communications systems, consoles, simulators, and other data acquisition, test, and measurement instruments and equipment, which are used to launch, track, position, and evaluate air and space vehicles. May record and interpret test data. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
  • Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
  • Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
  • Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

Salary and compensation for Aerospace Engineering and Operations Technologists and Technicians

Aerospace Engineering and Operations Technologists and Technicians earn a median hourly wage of about $32, and a median annual salary of $68,570.

Educational requirements for Aerospace Engineering and Operations Technologists and Technicians

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate’s degree. In addition, employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.

Foresters

Foresters may also have job titles such as Area Forester, Chief Unit Forester, Environmental Protection Forester, Fire Prevention Forester, Forest Practices Field Coordinator, Forester, Regional Forester, Resource Forester, Silviculturist, or Urban Forester.

What do Foresters do?

Foresters manage public and private forested lands for economic, recreational, and conservation purposes. May inventory the type, amount, and location of standing timber, appraise the timber’s worth, negotiate the purchase, and draw up contracts for procurement. May determine how to conserve wildlife habitats, creek beds, water quality, and soil stability, and how best to comply with environmental regulations. May devise plans for planting and growing new trees, monitor trees for healthy growth, and determine optimal harvesting schedules. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
  • Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.
  • Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.
  • Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Salary and compensation for Foresters

Foresters earn a median hourly wage of about $30, and a median annual salary of $63,980.

Educational requirements for Foresters

Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor’s degree, but some do not. In addition, employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.

Power Distributors and Dispatchers

Power Distributors and Dispatchers may also have job titles such as Control Operator, Distribution Dispatcher, Distribution System Operator, Electric System Operator, Power System Dispatcher, Power System Operator, System Operator, or Transmission System Operator.

What do Power Distributors and Dispatchers do?

Power Distributors and Dispatchers coordinate, regulate, or distribute electricity or steam. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
  • Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
  • Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.

Salary and compensation for Power Distributors and Dispatchers

Power Distributors and Dispatchers earn a median hourly wage of about $45, and a median annual salary of $95,100.

Educational requirements for Power Distributors and Dispatchers

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate’s degree. In addition, employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.

Explosives Workers Ordnance Handling Experts and Blasters

Explosives Workers Ordnance Handling Experts and Blasters may also have job titles such as Blast Hole Driller, Blaster, Explosive Technician, Powderman, or Unexploded Ordnance Quality Control Officer.

What do Explosives Workers Ordnance Handling Experts and Blasters do?

Explosives Workers Ordnance Handling Experts and Blasters place and detonate explosives to demolish structures or to loosen, remove, or displace earth, rock, or other materials. May perform specialized handling, storage, and accounting procedures. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.
  • Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.
  • Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

Salary and compensation for Explosives Workers Ordnance Handling Experts and Blasters

Explosives Workers Ordnance Handling Experts and Blasters earn a median hourly wage of about $23, and a median annual salary of $48,510.

Educational requirements for Explosives Workers Ordnance Handling Experts and Blasters

These occupations usually require a high school diploma. In addition, employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.

Conservation Scientists

Conservation Scientists may also have job titles such as Conservationist, Environmental Analyst, Erosion Control Specialist, Land Manager, Land Reclamation Specialist, Land Resource Specialist, Resource Conservation Specialist, Resource Conservationist, or Soil Conservationist.

What do Conservation Scientists do?

Conservation Scientists manage, improve, and protect natural resources to maximize their use without damaging the environment. May conduct soil surveys and develop plans to eliminate soil erosion or to protect rangelands. May instruct farmers, agricultural production managers, or ranchers in best ways to use crop rotation, contour plowing, or terracing to conserve soil and water; in the number and kind of livestock and forage plants best suited to particular ranges; and in range and farm improvements, such as fencing and reservoirs for stock watering. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.
  • Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.
  • Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

Salary and compensation for Conservation Scientists

Conservation Scientists earn a median hourly wage of about $30, and a median annual salary of $64,020.

Educational requirements for Conservation Scientists

Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor’s degree, but some do not. In addition, employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.

Audio and Video Technicians

Audio and Video Technicians may also have job titles such as Audio Technician, Audio Visual Specialist (AV Specialist), Audio Visual Technician (AV Technician), Media Technician, Operations Technician, Stagehand, or Video Technician.

What do Audio and Video Technicians do?

Audio and Video Technicians set up, maintain, and dismantle audio and video equipment, such as microphones, sound speakers, connecting wires and cables, sound and mixing boards, video cameras, video monitors and servers, and related electronic equipment for live or recorded events, such as concerts, meetings, conventions, presentations, podcasts, news conferences, and sporting events. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
  • Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

Salary and compensation for Audio and Video Technicians

Audio and Video Technicians earn a median hourly wage of about $23, and a median annual salary of $47,920.

Educational requirements for Audio and Video Technicians

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate’s degree. In addition, employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.

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